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From criminal justice to social justice: rethinking approaches to young adults subject to criminal justice control

From criminal justice to social justice: rethinking approaches to young adults subject to criminal justice control  is the last in a series of three that form part of the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies' contribution to the Transition to Adulthood Alliance, offers some proposals for what might be involved in a wholesale shift in governmental approaches to young adults subject to criminal justice control. It makes the case for interventions with young adults that place social justice, not criminal justice, at their heart.

Comparing coercive and non-coercive interventions

There is little or no benefit in the resort to incarceration and other forms of strict control for young people who break the law, according to a briefing from the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies.

In Comparing coercive and non-coercive interventions James McGuire, Professor of Forensic Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool, argues that the expectation that the problem of offending by young people can be solved by coercion and control is essentially illusory.

In the briefing, Professor McGuire:

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