Publication

Ethnicity, harm and crime: a discussion paper

Discussion papers from a roundtable discussion on ethnicity and social harm the Centre hosted in October 2008. The lead paper by Rebecca Roberts and Will McMahon is available for download, along with response papers by Professors Danny Dorling, James Nazroo and Lucinda Platt.
By 
Rebecca Roberts and Will McMahon
1 October 2008
Speech

What should be the goals of the criminal justice system?

The Centre's director Richard Garside spoke at an ESRC-funded seminar on 'Regulation and criminal justice'. He was responding to a paper by Professor Andrew Sanders on the purpose of the criminal justice system.

By 
Richard Garside
6 November 2007
Comment

Making an impact

At the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies we are widely respected for our varied and significant reports, events and initiatives. To name but a few recent examples include

  • The
  • ...
By 
Richard Garside
17 June 2013
Publication

Law-abiding majority? The everyday crimes of the middle classes

Professor Susanne Karstedt and Dr Stephen Farrall put forward a thoughtful and challenging contribution to the debate about ‘crime’ and ‘criminality’ and role of the market. Whilst politicians have professed to be enacting criminal justice policies in a bid to protect the ‘law abiding majority’ the...
By 
Professor Susanne Karstedt and Dr Stephen Farrall
12 June 2007
Publication

The problems of everyday life

The Centre for Crime and Justice Studies is pleased to publish The problems of everyday life as part of the Whose Justice? project. Vicky Kemp, Pascoe Pleasence and Nigel Balmer of the Legal Services Research Centre present their findings from the 2004 Civil and Social Justice Survey.
By 
Dr Vicky Kemp, Professor Pascoe Pleasence and Dr Nigel Balmer
1 October 2007
Publication

Farepak victims speak out

Victims of the Farepak collapse are demanding compensation, better regulation and for key figures in Farepak to be held to account for their actions. Some 150,000 savers lost an estimated £50 million when the Christmas hamper scheme collapsed in October 2006. The research, carried out by Dr Basia...
By 
Dr Basia Spalek and Sam King
19 November 2007
Publication

Social justice and criminal justice

Despite more than a decade in power, New Labour has failed to tackle deep-rooted social injustices, according to a collection of essays from more than 20 researchers and academics. Historically high levels of inequality, endemic violence against women and the increasing reliance on criminal justice...
By 
Edited by Rebecca Roberts and Will McMahon
26 November 2007
Publication

Crime is in the air: air pollution and regulation in the UK

In his report, Professor Reece Walters highlights the fact that an estimated 24,000 British residents die prematurely every year and thousands more are hospitalised, because of air pollution. Furthermore, the European Union is currently preparing a legal case against the British government for...
By 
Professor Reece Walters
1 September 2009
Publication

Social harm and crime at a global level

Poverty kills, yet rarely seems to provoke the political and public outrage that conventional `crime' often does. In this What is crime? briefing Social harm and crime at a global level we publish an edited transcript of a lecture given by Dr David Roberts at King's College London in April 2009...
By 
Dr David Roberts
1 September 2009
Publication

Criminal obsessions: Why harm matters more than crime (2nd edition)

The contributors show how social harm relates to social and economic inequalities that are at the heart of the liberal state. This second edition of Criminal obsessions includes an additional essay by Simon Pemberton in which he develops theoretically the concept of social harm and discusses the...
By 
Danny Dorling, Dave Gordon, Paddy Hillyard, Christina Pantazis, Simon Pemberton, Steve Tombs
1 October 2008
Publication

Crisis of enforcement: The decriminalisation of death and injury at work

The report found that at least 1,300 people died as a result of fatal occupational injuries in 2005-06 in England and Wales, compared with 765 homicide victims. Non-fatal workplace injuries requiring hospitalisation were also likely to be greater that year than those needing such treatment...
By 
Professor Steve Tombs and Dr David Whyte
17 June 2008