Prison Service Journal

The Prison Service Journal is a peer reviewed journal published by HM Prison Service of England and Wales. Its purpose is to promote discussion on issues related to the work of the Prison Service, the wider criminal justice system and associated fields. It aims to present reliable information and a range of views about these issues.

It is hosted by the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies following the re-structure of the Prison Service and the loss of the Prison Service website.

Any queries regarding the PSJ, back issues or editorial articles for forthcoming issues should be sent to psjournal@hotmail.com. The postal address for contact is:

Prison Service Journal
c/o Print Shop Manager
HMP Leyhill
Wotton-under-Edge
Gloucestershire
GL12 8HL


This issue has a special focus on the informal dynamics of survival in Latin American prisons, including articles on:

  • 'Surviving in the New Mass Carceral Zone' by Sacha Darke and Chris Garces
  • 'Neoliberal Penology and Criminal Finance in Honduras' by Jon... Read more

This issue includes: 

  • 'Current Debates over Restorative Justice: Concept, Definition and Practice' by Masahiro Suzuki and Dr Hennessey Hayes, and
  • 'Restorative justice in prison: A contradiction in terms or a challenge and a reality?' by... Read more

This issue includes:

  • 'Prison Building Does Size matter? A Re-Assessment' by Dr Iolo Madoc-Jones, Dr Emyr Williams, Dr Caroline Hughes and Joanne Turley. And
  • 'An exploration of prisoners’ perceptions of the Incentives and Earned Privileges (IEP) scheme: The... Read more

This special edition focuses on young people in custody

May 2016

This special edition focuses on the transformational potential of prison education

January 2016

The special focus for this issue is, Prison: Unlocking prison research

November 2015

This edition has a special focus on Prison Management

September 2015

This edition has a special focus on reducing prison violence

July 2015 No: 220

This edition includes articles with a focus on youth imprisonment, the experience of state care, immigration detention and community punishment.

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