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  • Friday, 25 January, 2019

    The private developer that owns the Territorial Army site next to Holloway prison is now stating they can offer only 30 per cent of their development for affordable housing, reports the Islington Tribune. This is despite the 50 per cent minimum set by Islington Council.

  • Wednesday, 23 January, 2019

    Susan McVie, Ellie Bates and Rebecca Pillinger recently published their research findings on violence reduction in Glasgow and London on the LSE blog

    The findings support our own research, presented in Young people, violence and knives, a briefing we published in November examining knife violence trends and reduction efforts in Glasgow. 

  • Tuesday, 22 January, 2019

    In November, we launched the campaign to end child imprisonment along with Article 39, Howard League for Penal Reform, INQUEST, Just for Kids Law and the National Association for Youth Justice.

    The latest from the campaign is a comment piece on the serious case review of abuse and use of dangerous restraint at G4S-run Medway secure training centre. The case review was published earlier this week and was launched after Panorama had exposed the conditions at the centre in 2016.

  • Monday, 14 January, 2019

    The Centre's director, Richard Garside, is co-signatory of a letter to Minister of Justice David Gauke. 

    The letter, mentioned in the weekend's Observer, expresses concern over the decision to re-let Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) contracts. 

  • Thursday, 20 December, 2018

    The Centre for Crime and Justice Studies and the Harm & Evidence Research Collaborative at The Open University, in partnership with Professor Joe Sim of Liverpool John Moores University, will be holding a major conference on prison abolition in the UK in 2019.

    The conference will be on Thursday 23 and Friday 24 May, at The Open University campus in Milton Keynes.

    The prison system in the UK is in ongoing, systemic crisis. While politicians pay lip service to the need to reduce prisoner numbers, further growth and expansion are far more likely.

  • Tuesday, 18 December, 2018

    Last Thursday, parliament held a debate, 'Public health model to reduce youth violence'. 

  • Wednesday, 12 December, 2018

    The Centre is pleased to publish J M Moore's report, Downsize, build, transform: An assessment of the Justice Matters workshops, which provides the results of semistructered interviews of participants who took part in the workshops that made up part of our Justice Matters project.

  • Tuesday, 04 December, 2018

    The Centre's Research Fellow, Connor Woodman, spoke at Rebellious Lawyering (RebLaw) 2018 last weekend, held at the University of Law to an audience of students, lawyers, organisers and researchers from across the UK.  

    Connor spoke on 'Spycops: The future for the Undercover Policing Inquiry' which was based on his two forthcoming reports investigating the history of political policing in the UK and how the state has sought to constrain and undermine dissent against racism, patriarchy and class through infiltration and other methods. 

  • Monday, 03 December, 2018

    The Centre is delighted to be part of a new collaborative campaign to end child imprisonment.

    Launching at an event last Thursday at the House of Lords, the campaign supports approaches that prioritise children’s needs, safety and futures, and advocates for the closure of child prisons in England and Wales. 

    We look forward to working with our colleagues at organisations including Article 39, the Howard League for Penal Reform, Inquest, Just for Kids Law and the National Association for Youth Justice on this important issue. 

  • Monday, 03 December, 2018

    Over the past year, we have hosted a Research Fellow, Connor Woodman, sponsored by the Barry Amiel & Norman Melburn Trust. The Centre is today publishing two papers on undercover policing Connor has written as part of this Fellowship, under the title Spycops in context.

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