Publication

cjm 101: #BlackLivesMatter

Tuesday, 29 September 2015

#BlackLivesMatter is the slogan adopted by a social movement in the USA following the deaths last year of black people by killed the police.  Racism is institutionalised and a feature of everyday life in the USA, in spite of the civil rights movement during the 1960s.

This side of the Atlantic, we were led to believe that the UK is a 'post-racial' society, where people from all ethnic groups felt safe and discrimination was something consigned to the past.

However, according to a recent report from the Young Review, Improving outcomes for young black and/or Muslim men in the Criminal Justice System, there is now greater disporportinality in the UK than there is in the USA.

Guest edited by Will McMahon, the Deputy Director of the Centre, this issue includes a series of articles:

  • Janet Alder on her brother’s unlawful killing in custody and the subsequent police surveillance of her family
  • Aggrey Burke writes about achieving a sense of belonging following displacement and alienation
  • J M Moore argues that the continuation of punitive strategies is firmly rooted in colonial history
  • Anthony Gunter traces the extent of criminalisation and how it extends across institutions
  • Rebecca Roberts explores the social and historical context to disproportionality in the criminal justice system
  • Matt Ford brings together data highlighting areas of life where people are penalised for the colour of their skin
  • Jules Holroyd discusses implicit racial bias 
  • Rebekah Delsol discusses profiling across the USA and Europe
  • Steve Tombs reviews Simon Pemberton’s book, Harmful Societies. Understanding Social Harm.

The articles are free to read below. To view this issue in pdf format, please visit the Taylor & Francis website here (subscription required).