Comment
28 May 2014

Rebecca Roberts, Senior Policy Associate at the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, details the need for a bold and unapologetic agenda to bring about real change for women.

Comment
27 May 2014
The UK takes a relaxed and supportive attitude to elite shooters — even though legally-held firearms are used time and again to murder and maim — writes Peter Squires, Professor of Criminology and Public Policy at the University of Brighton.
Comment
23 May 2014

Barnardo’s reflection on its first two years at Cedars 'pre-departure accommodation' raises once again the problem of NGOs working to a state agenda, Frances Webber argues.

Speech
22 May 2014

On 21 May Richard Garside spoke at a 'People's Parliament' event on 'Policing, Prisons and Probation: Current and Future Agendas'. This is a write up of what he said.

Comment
20 May 2014

Paul Gavin of Kingston University, London, argues that imprisonment for children should be replaced by restorative justice and improved educational provision.

Comment
19 May 2014

Nigel Farage, the UKIP leader, gets his facts on immigation and crime from the ITV drama documentary 'Fraud Squad'.

We know this because he uses an episode broadcast in April 2012 in his full-page 'open letter' advert in today's Daily Telegraph, to back up the claim that '92% of all ATM crime in London is committed by Romanians'.

Comment
19 May 2014

Rona Epstein, Honorary Research Fellow at Coventry University, argues that when it comes to balancing off the human rights of the child and the seriousness of the mother's offence the rights of the child should come first.

Comment
16 May 2014

Mike Guilfoyle argues that building trusting relationships with service users in probation takes time, effort, commitment and a shared belief in the change process.

Comment
15 May 2014

In the sixth in a series of posts in advance of this week's How Violent is Britain? conference Dr Vicki Sentas of UNSW Australia argues that the war on terror has generated a pattern of extrajudicial killings, rendition and torture.

Comment
14 May 2014
In the fifth of a series of posts in advance of this week's How Violent is Britain? conference Dr David Stuckler of the University of Oxford and Dr Sarah Steele of Queen Mary, University of London, argue that dog-whistle immigration politics runs counter to the principles by which the National Health Service was originally established.
Comment
13 May 2014
In the fourth of a series of posts in advance of this week's How Violent is Britain? conference Dr Victoria Canning of Liverpool John Moores University argues that the British government’s treatment of survivors of torture, sexual violence, and persecution is all too often degrading and dehumanising violence.
Comment
12 May 2014
In the third of a series of posts in advance of this week's How Violent is Britain? conference Dr Will Jackson of Liverpool John Moores University writes about the 'out of control' policing of anti-fracking protestors.