News

A digest of news from the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies and beyond. Sign up to get the best bits emailed to your inbox once a month.


  • Monday, 08 February, 2016

    The Centre for Crime and Justice Studies has responded to the latest speech from the Prime Minister, David Cameron, on plans to reform the prison system; 

    Richard Garside, Director of the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, said:

  • Sunday, 07 February, 2016

    Our director Richard Garside is quoted in a Sunday Mirror article on the investigation into sexual abuse allegations against Sir Cliff Richard.

    The investigation has already lasted 18 months.

    Richard told the paper that, by their nature, allegations of sexual abuse sometimes take a long time to investigate.'People would want to be confident that if charges arise then there are good evidential grounds,' he said. 'But at the same time it’s understandable that now, 18 months on, it’s going to be a source of anxiety'.

  • Monday, 01 February, 2016

    The Centre for Crime and Justice Studies has responded to the announcement that the Prime Minister, David Cameron, has asked David Lammy, Labour MP for Tottenham, to lead a review into 'racial bias' in the criminal justice system. 

    The Centre's deputy director, Will McMahon said,

    'This review is long overdue, as is the implied acknowledgement that racism and discrimination is a problem in the criminal justice system.' 

  • Monday, 01 February, 2016

    On Friday, 29 January Chuka Umunna MP led a debate in parliament on gangs and youth violence in London where he referenced our recent report on Joint Enterprise, gangs and racism. Reflecting on the findings, he agreed the term 'gang' was problematic. 

    He said:

  • Monday, 01 February, 2016

    The outgoing Chief Inspector of Prisons, Nick Hardwick, has told The Guardian that former Justice Secretary, Chris Grayling, tried to prevent him from publishing criticisms of government policies. The Chief Inspector of Prisons' Annual Report 2013-14 blamed a surge in self-inflicted deaths, suicides and assaults in prisons on policies and decisions made by the Ministry of Justice. 

  • Friday, 29 January, 2016

    Centre for Crime and Justice Studies January 2016 ebulletin

    2016 Eve Saville Memorial Lecture: Has violent crime fallen?

    Professor Sylvia Walby will be speaking about her ground-breaking research on Tuesday, 12 April.

    Book today to avoid disappointment.

  • Friday, 29 January, 2016

    Bookings are now open for this year's Eve Saville memorial lecture, to be delivered by Professor Sylvia Walby, Distinguished Professor of Sociology and UNESCO Chair in Gender Research at Lancaster University.

    At the lecture, in London on 12 April, Professor Walby will present ground-breaking new research showing that women have born the brunt of rises in violence victimisation since the start of the financial crisis in 2008/09. Men, by contrast, have experienced falling rates of violence victimisation.

  • Wednesday, 27 January, 2016

    On 25 and 26 of January, the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies held three events to launch publication Dangerous associations: Joint enterprise, gangs and racism researched and written by Patrick Williams and Becky Clarke of Manchester Metropolitan University.

  • Tuesday, 26 January, 2016

    MPs and Peers will today hear calls for urgent action to address the injustices of joint enterprise convictions. The call follows the publication of results of a survey of nearly 250 serving prisoners convicted under joint enterprise provisions. The survey found clear evidence that black and minority ethnic people are serving long prison sentences because of unfair and racist criminal justice practices.

  • Monday, 25 January, 2016

    A survey of nearly 250 serving prisoners convicted under joint enterprise provisions has found evidence that black and minority ethnic people are serving long prison sentences because of unfair and racist criminal justice practices. The survey results are contained in a new report published today by the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies.

Pages